Edward Kelly puts career earnings into good use by putting up small business in Baguio

ABS-CBN Sports on Dec 12, 2018 02:08 PM
Edward Kelly invests career earnings in small business
"I saved up money from my winnings to put up this business. I don't want to compromise my family's future because I'll never know what I'll be in my 50’s," - Edward Kelly

Professional athletes in the world of combat sports have garnered a reputation of failing to wisely invest their earnings for a better future as many would end up with nothing after they call it a career.

 

With the intent of securing his family’s future, Filipino mixed martial artist Edward "The Ferocious" Kelly seeks to break the stigma by investing in a small-scale enterprise in his hometown of Baguio City.

 

The 34-year-old hard-hitter is on the verge of opening a water refilling station called "Mr. Twenty One Water Delivery."

 

Kelly’s business venture is a nod to his record-setting 21-second knockout of Cambodia’s Meas Meul at  ONE: GLOBAL SUPERHEROES in Manila, Philippines last January.

 

"The water station is ready to operate. I am just working on the necessary documents to officially start the business," he shared.

 

"I have thought of this type of business way back. My cousin wanted to try this livelihood, but since he's away, I got the opportunity to do it. I am the first in our barangay to do this.”

 

Aside from earning an extra income, his decision to put up a water refilling station is also driven by his dedication to the sport as he spends most of his time in Bataan province, where he owns a boutique store that sells used clothing.

 

According to Kelly, his new business will compel him to stay in Baguio City, allowing him to train at the famed Team Lakay gym on a regular basis.

 

“This business will make me stay in Baguio. This will refrain me from staying in Bataan. My wife and I planned to put up a business, so there's something I can do and earn from while training and waiting for a bout," he explained.

 

Seeing fellow athletes succumb to financial depression when they retire, Kelly revealed that it has become a habit for him to go straight to the bank and deposit a portion of his prize purse after each and every bout.

 

"I saved up money from my winnings to put up this business. I don't want to compromise my family's future because I'll never know what I'll be in my 50’s," he stressed.

 

As he sets up an example, Kelly hopes that other mixed martial artists will follow suit with the objective of ending the negative impression that people in their profession lack financial literacy.

 

"My fellow athletes should start saving their purses. They should think of another source of income while still active. Our prime in the sport fades, but it’s better to make an investment. Let’s join hands in breaking the stigma.”

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