2018 PBA Draft Baller Breakdown: Javee Mocon

Anton Roxas on Dec 15, 2018 09:46 PM
2018 PBA Draft Baller Breakdown: Javee Mocon
Javee Mocon established himself as the NCAA's best power forward. Can he be among the best at that position in the PBA?

At the age of 23, Javee Mocon has one of the biggest collection of trophies among all draftees. In the last seven years, Mocon has won two Juniors titles and four Seniors titles. Why wouldn’t you pass up an opportunity to acquire a certified winner for your ball club?

 

STRENGTHS

When you’re so used to winning, it becomes second nature. Mocon is the type of player who is easy to coach because he is willing to do whatever it takes to win. His attitude and work ethic is admirable. He will willingly take on any role given to him and make sure that no matter what it is, his presence will be felt.

In his first two seasons with the Red Lions, he came off the bench to back up Art dela Cruz and provided much-needed energy and swagger to sustain the efforts of the first group. As a starter for San Beda in the last three years, Mocon became the premier power forward in the NCAA. At 6’4”, Mocon was at his best operating inside the arc. He possesses a reliable mid-range jumper and can finish in the paint effectively as well.

In Game 2 of the Season 94 Finals, Mocon’s last collegiate game ever, he unveiled a new weapon that he will surely need in the next level: the three-point shot. Mocon shot four out of eight from beyond the arc, letting the world know that he has been working on his game in preparation for the PBA.

AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT

Although he looked confident taking threes in his final game for San Beda, will he still be that confident letting it fly in the pros? That remains to be seen. One thing we never saw from Mocon as a student-athlete was dribbling ability. Right now, his skill when it comes to handling the basketball is very basic. I have never seen Mocon dribble the ball coast-to-coast all the way to the basket. But, then again, he never had to because he was so obedient and strictly played within the boundaries of his position.

Perhaps another thing he should work on his passing. Not that he didn’t pass the ball in college (2.3 assists per game), it’s just something he wasn’t known for and an aspect of his game he could unlock. Imagine Mocon pump-faking from the three-point line before making a move towards the basket with the option to kick the ball out to shooters or making a drop pass to the big men in the paint? That’s a tough cover.

 

 

 

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